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How 16 ships create as much pollution as all the cars in the world

Last week it was revealed that 54 oil tankers are anchored off the coast of Britain, refusing to unload their fuel until prices have risen. But that is not the only scandal in the shipping world.

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Solar energy cells you can print out catching commercial eye, says CSIRO

Renewable energy generation that allows flexible solar power cells to be printed off and attached to places such as windows and smartphones is close to commercialisation, the CSIRO has said. Work on printed solar cells has been under way since 2007 through the Victorian Organic Solar Cell Consortium, which includes CSIRO, and Melbourne and Monash universities.

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Wiping the slate clean: Erasing cellular memory and resetting human stem cells

12:00, Biology/Cell & Microbiology Babraham Institute scientists, in collaboration with colleagues at the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute and the European Bioinformatics Institute, have published findings today in the journal Cell giving hope that researchers will be able to generate base-state, naïve human stem cells for future medical applications.

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Economics: Manufacture renewables to build energy security

Wang Dingchang/Xinhua Press/Corbis China's rise to become the world's largest power producer and source of carbon emissions through burning coal is well recognized. But the nation's renewable-energy systems are expanding even faster than its fossil-fuel and nuclear power.

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Longevity Gene in Fruit Flies Hints at Coming Genetic Discoveries to Slow Aging

In the last few centuries, medical advances have greatly lengthened lifespans. Among other causes, a central driver has been improved care at the beginning of life, when declining infant mortality rates have boosted average life expectancy at birth. Now, as more people live into their eighties, nineties, and beyond, researchers are focusing on the end of life.

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Stanford engineers design ant-sized radio to control 'Internet of Things'

A Stanford engineering team has built a radio the size of an ant, a device so energy efficient that it gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna.

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Space garbage men: Tracking the movement and spin of orbiting space junk

When we are in the process of colonising space, or even getting out of our Earth's orbit, there will be a danger of the rubbish circling the planet damaging spacecraft or even stopping us getting away from the planet. Previously NASA has said that the amount or trash that is in orbit around the world includes more than 500,000 objects.

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Smartphones to get smarter with plastic lens

Eureka Science winners Tri Phan and Steve Lee at the Garvin Institute in Sydney. Photo: Getty Images/Brendon Thorne Want to transform your smartphone into a microscope fit for top-level medical imaging? Easy. Just add a lentil-sized plastic lens to the camera and bingo, your now super-smart phone has a high-resolution microscope.

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Jurassic Farm - Modern Farmer

The 21st-century back-to-the-farm movement stems from our yearning to escape the artificiality of modern urban life. Yet the domesticated plants and animals now found in most gardens and farms are themselves artificial, the results of extensive human meddling, cross-breeding and genetic manipulation.

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World Bank warns of global jobs crisis

The world is facing a global jobs crisis that is hurting the chances of reigniting economic growth and there is no magic bullet to solve the problem, the World Bank warned on Tuesday.

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Printable organs will change medicine

Over the past 20 years, annual spending on biopharma R & D has almost tripled to more than $50 billion. At the same time, in spite of these huge sums in investment, the average number of drugs beings approved has decreased, and more than 150 drugs have either failed in late-stage clinical trials or have been withdrawn from the market.

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The Face of the Apple Watch Holds Clues to a More Flexible Future | MIT Technology Review

One of the innovations packed inside the Apple Watch-and highlighted by designer Jony Ive at the company's grand unveiling this week-is a flexible display. Contrary to some earlier speculation about the device, however, this doesn't mean you can actually bend the screen.

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Robots Aren't Out to Get You. You Should Be Terrified of Them Anyway.

Adapted from Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies by Nick Bostrom. Out now from Oxford University Press. In the recent discussion over the risks of developing superintelligent machines-that is, machines with general intelligence greater than that of humans-two narratives have emerged. One side argues that if a machine ever achieved advanced intelligence, it...

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The dawn of tiny tech: Molecular electronics closer to reality

Electronic chips could see a radical reduction in size thanks to the creation of a new type of carbon molecule that conducts electricity in only direction. Created by a team of scientists from the US, Belgium, Germany and Ukraine, the molecule is a combination of football-shaped buckminsterfullerenes - also known as buckyballs - and diamond-shaped diamondoids.

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Cutting the cord on soft robots

From Harvard engineers, a machine that can walk through flames | Researchers at Harvard's School for Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have developed the world's first untethered soft robot - a quadruped that can stand up and walk away from its designers.

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